Taking Back Sunday

Channel 93.3 Presents

Taking Back Sunday

Every Time I Die, All Get Out

Tue, August 8, 2017

6:30 pm

$30.00 - $35.00

This event is all ages

Taking Back Sunday
Taking Back Sunday
In case you don't know us, here are some words from a long-time friend andjournalist, Jonah Bayer, about our new album, Tidal Wave...
It's difficult to believe that Tidal Wave is Taking Back Sunday's seventh album. While most of their peers have either broken up, faded away or reunited to capitalize on the emo scene's wildfire revival, Taking Back Sunday have always been the Pearl Jam of the scene in the sense that they've consistently plugged along and continued to reinvent themselves regardless of what was trendy at the time. "By the time most bands get to this point in their career they are pretty set in what they do but we were really mindful about approaching our musical ideas differently this time around and staying true to where the five of us are in our lives right now," frontman Adam Lazzara explains. "This album is truly an expression of what Taking Back Sunday is during this snapshot in time as opposed to what we think people expect from our band."

This ethic is nothing new for Taking Back Sunday who started out playing basements at VFW halls in 1999 in Long Island alongside acts like Thursday and Midtown before transitioning into mainstream icons via hit singles such as "MakeDamnSure" and "Set Phasers To Stun." After losing a few members following the release of their breakthrough debut album Tell All Your Friends, the group reunited with their original lineup of Lazzara, guitarists John Nolan and Eddie Reyes, bassist Shaun Cooper and drummer Mark O'Connell six years ago shortly before the creation of 2011's self-titled album. Correspondingly Tidal Wave is not only the follow-up to 2014's Happiness Isbut also marks the first time the group have ever made three consecutive albums with the same lineup. For Tidal Wave,theband also brought back producer Mike Sapone and mixer Claudius Mittendorfer,who both worked on Happiness Is. "I think with this album we all really learned to trust each other with our ideas and that'ssomething that took a while to cultivate when we first got back together," Nolan admits. "There is no way these songs would have come out the way it did if we didn't believe that each member's ideas were worth bringing to the table."
Tidal Wavealso marks the first time that Taking Back Sunday wrote in the studio as they recorded and having that type of fluidity when it came to the songwriting also lent itself to heightened collaboration and creativity throughout the process. "It was really amazing to beable to write in the studio because we could come up with an idea, perform it and then listen back to it immediately instead of feeling boxed in by what we did on demos," Lazzara explains. "Every song was up for being changed or rewritten when we were in the studio, which was an approach that Adam really encouraged, and nothing was ever set in stone in the sense that if someone had any idea for how to make a song better we would give it a shot," Nolan adds. "That approach has potential to be really disastrous but we were fortunate enough to see everything through and use our collective judgment to take things to the next level." Nolan specifically cites 'Homecoming' as a song the band constantly kept returning to in order to finally achieve the version that's present on Tidal Wave.

In many ways the album showcases the strengths of Taking Back Sunday's musical evolution from the blazing opener "Death Wolf" to the orchestrally tinged ballad "Fences" and syncopated anthem "Call Come Running." However as stated earlier there are also plenty of surprises on Tidal Wavesuch as the four-on-the-floor title track which sees them channeling the Clash both sonically and energetically. "I think this idea of making songs that we wrote for ourselves started with Happiness Is and since the reaction to that album was so positive it really encouraged us to take that a step further with this album," Nolan explains. Furthermore songs like "You Can't Look Back" see Lazzara taking his vocals to stratospheric new levels in order to elevate these songs to a whole other plane of existence. "In the same spirit of being fearless when it came to the music, I tried to lean on the influence of some of my favorite singers on this album," Lazzara explains. Case in point, during "Holy Water" it seems as if he is digging so deep that the song is the sonic equivalent of a bittersweet punch to the gut.
Admittedly the process of making Tidal Wave wasn't easy but ultimately the best art doesn't come out of stagnancy and the band couldn't be happier with the final product. "We pushed ourselves so hard that when I listen back to this album now I don't second-guess any of it," Lazzara explains. "I just sit back and think about how glad I am that we put ourselves through that because without that persistence thisrecord never would have evolved to what it eventually became." Sure, it may seem ironic that Taking Back Sunday have transcended the emo tag right when the genre is undergoing a resurgence –but if you really think about it, those types of decisions are exactly what have kept the band relevant. "I do so many interviews now where I get asked about the emo revival and I'm like, 'whatare you talking about? We never slowed down and we never quit," he summarizes. "I think this record is going to help us reconnect with our old fans as well as cross paths with some new ones but in the end we wrote it for ourselves sand we couldn't be happier with it."
In other words when Lazzarasings, "It's taken me all this time to see... I'm coming home" on the acoustic showstopper "Homecoming" it's not just about geography, it also parallels the next exciting chapter in Taking Back Sunday's career. Welcome back, guys.
Every Time I Die
Every Time I Die
"The whole winter, the temperature was in the low teens. Utterly freezing," says Every Time I Die's frontman Keith Buckley regarding the months that yielded their eighth full-length album. Such is the price you pay for living in Buffalo, NY. Granted, the weather seems like a rather mundane topic for the normally acerbic and irreverent vocalist, but even the most acid-tongued hardcore band must have their sociable side, right? But Buckley and his cohorts Jordan Buckley (guitar), Andy Williams (guitar), Daniel Davison (drums), and Steve Micciche (bass) aren't so hard up for pathos at this point that they're grumbling about the temperature outside. If anything, Low Teens is their most poignant and impassioned album in a career full of sardonic illuminations and pit-inciting fervor.

The icy backdrop of Buffalo underscores a winter of dramatic change. Most notably, the band was on tour in Toronto in December when Keith received a phone call that his wife was in the hospital with a life-threatening pregnancy complication. It was a harrowing night as Buckley left the tour and raced home to overwhelming uncertainty. "I was facing death, not in a symbolic sort of 'cyclical change' metaphor but literally," says Buckley with his token literary-minded self-awareness. "If I lost my wife, I would have to raise my daughter for her. If I lost my daughter, my wife and I would be forced to try and cope. But if I lost them both my life would end and I would see to it. Once I knew that in my heart it became the only certainty I had, and that was a relief." Both wife and daughter survived the ordeal, but the moment of crisis had a lasting impact on Buckley and an inevitable role in shaping the lyrical scope of Low Teens. "It was abject helplessness, and that entirely new feeling opened up a lot of questions about place and purpose. I honestly don't think that's too far off from the lyrical content of our other songs but anyone that saw the news knows the source this time. They know that this is a response to a very specific event and not just a dude shoehorning an existential crisis into his routine for some interesting imagery." When Buckley yells "untimely ripped into this world, I was born again as a girl" in the searing ring-the-alarm track "Petal", there is no metaphor, no thinly veiled allegory. The birth of his daughter literally saved his life.

Lyrical motifs aside, other big changes were afoot during that Buffalo winter. From a sonic standpoint, the most crucial development was writing with new drummer Daniel Davison. Fans of Every Time I Die's caustic combination of savage metallic hardcore and pentatonic riff-laden classic rock will not be disappointed by Low Teens' thrash attacks and Southern-boogie breakdowns. But Davison's heft, dexterity, and creativity pushed the band forward. "Daniel joined and not only further unlocked Andy and Jordan and Steve's potential but put such a unique force behind the band's dynamic," Buckley says of his new bandmate. "I know that everything that has happened is necessary for what is presently happening but, man, to think about what the band might have been like if we had him sooner—private jets, shows on the damn moon." You can hear this new energy on "Glitches", which blazes with the kind of raw basement hardcore that originally catalyzed the group, but rages with a pinpoint accuracy beyond any meager hardcore band's reach. "C++" marries desert rock croons, Unbroken's metallic riffage, and a pile-driving chorus into a relentless hook-laden anthem. "The Coin Has A Say" operates as an extremity test, with every gear-shift somehow pushing the band into inexplicably heavier territories. Yes, Every Time I Die has always juggled hardcore urgency, metal brutalism, and rock melodies, but never has it felt this instinctive or this vicious.
Low Teens' razor-sharp sound and auditory barbarism was also abetted by engineer and producer Will Putney (Acacia Strain, Body Count, Exhumed). Every Time I Die have always opted to avoid complacency and mix things up with the recording process, but Putney proved to be an even more valuable component to the album than expected. "We just like change," says Buckley. "Will had a hunger we found exciting. He was willing to do whatever it took to make this record which included coming to Buffalo and working in a strange studio. If he was willing to step out of his comfort zone, so were we. And I definitely don't mean to disparage any other producer we've had but I have never in my life heard so many incredible ideas for an Every Time I Die record come from one man." And indeed, Putney adeptly captured the band's dichotomic ability to juggle melody and malice. Low Teens' guest vocalists further demonstrate these polarized extremes, with formidable bellower Tim Singer (Deadguy, Kiss It Goodbye, No Escape) roaring alongside Buckley on opening track "Fear and Trembling" and longtime friend Brendan Urie (Panic! at the Disco) providing a melodic counterpoint on "It Remembers".
Change may be a welcome element to Every Time I Die's creative process when it comes to studio personnel, but family crises and rotating band members can be debilitating developments. The pressure drop that yielded Low Teens could have crippled a lesser band, but Every Time I Die weathered the winter to deliver their strongest offering to date because of, not in spite of, these hardships and roadblocks. Epitaph Records is proud to release Every Time I Die's eighth album Low Teens on September 23rd.
All Get Out
All Get Out
Four years without new music can be a death sentence for any artist, and when an absence like that follows the release of a debut album, circumstances can get dire. But few acts are able to amass a cult following as rapidly as South Carolina-based indie rock outfit All Get Out did with 2011's The Season, a full-length record that has proven to have near-infinite replayability.

"I needed a break," songwriter and vocalist Nathan Hussey says. "I needed to regroup and really think about where I was, what I was doing, and how I was doing it."

Finally, the band is back in action in 2015, and is ready to share a brand-new EP, Movement, on April 14 via Favorite Gentlemen Recordings and Bad Timing Records.

"The EP goes in a direction that feels natural for All Get Out," Hussey explains. "It's heavier, and it's kind of a sister to our last release in its rawness. The Season is neatly put together, and Movement is a little sloppy, a little less intentional. The main concept here, of course, is movement. It's how you know things are still alive.

"I started writing the title track in 2013. The first two verses are about how changes happen in a way that people don't understand. And I'm kind of saying, you don't have to get it, you don't have to understand. And as the song was being written over those two years, it called me into the idea of movement."

Movement isn't a reintroduction or regeneration — it's a reaffirmation. It's a torrent of spirit at its most raw moments, an unabashed exorcism of the things that keep us awake at night in the pursuit of a life with deserved purpose. Continuing to gravitate toward the unoccupied spaces between indie and rock, All Get Out's return to the spotlight presents an opportunity for listeners to fall in love all over again with one of the most dynamic groups in this genre.
Venue Information:
Summit Music Hall
1902 Blake St.
Denver, CO, 80208
http://thesummitmusichall.com/