Shooter Jennings & Waymore's Outlaws

Shooter Jennings & Waymore's Outlaws

Radio Birds, Casey James Prestwood

Wed, June 21, 2017

7:00 pm

$5.00 - $45.00

This event is all ages

Shooter Jennings & Waymore's Outlaws
The only son of country legends Waylon Jennings and Jessi Colter, Shooter Jennings literally spent his childhood on a tour bus. Born Waylon Albright Jennings, Shooter was playing drums by the time he was five years old and had already begun taking piano lessons, only to break them off and follow his own path to an understanding of the instrument.
He discovered guitar at 14 and rock & roll (particularly Southern rock and the loose-limbed hard rock of Guns N' Roses) at 16. Soon he moved from Nashville to L.A., where he assembled a rock band called Stargunn. Stargunn earned a strong local reputation for its live shows, and enjoyed a six- or seven-year run on the L.A. circuit before Jennings rediscovered his outlaw country roots and dissolved the band.

After a short stay in New York, where Jennings assembled material for a country project, he returned to L.A. and put together a second band -- this time with solid country roots -- which he named the .357s. Jennings and the band holed up in the studio, eventually emerging with a rambunctious country album called Put the O Back in Country, which was released in 2005 on Universal South Records. Following in his father's footsteps, but with his own feisty, scrappy sense of country, Jennings placed himself in a fine position to both explore that legacy and carve out his own. A second album, Electric Rodeo (which was actually recorded before Put the O Back in Country), appeared in 2006, followed by a live set, Live at Irving Plaza, later in the year. Jennings' third solo effort, The Wolf, was released in October 2007, featuring a cover of Dire Straits' "Walk of Life" (whose composer, Mark Knopfler, had been a longtime family friend). A month later, Jennings became a father. His girlfriend, actress Drea De Matteo, gave birth to Alabama Gypsy Rose in November. He proposed to De Matteo in 2009 on-stage in Utica, New York. He renamed his backing band Hierophant for his fourth studio album, Black Ribbons, a concept record produced by Dave Cobb. It appeared early in 2010. Later in the year, the album was re-released in a special edition entitled Black Ribbons: The Living Album. The second version was sold on a USB flash drive in the shape of a tarot card. It featured the studio record and live performances by Hierophant. In early 2011, Jennings and blogger Adam Sheets came up with the idea of creating XXX, a new radio format that would focus on insurgent country, rock, and hybrids of both, from new and established artists, that fell far outside the narrow conceits of mainstream radio and were thus ignored. It gained traction and a channel on Sirius/XM where both men served as program hosts. Jennings also moved to New York City with De Matteo. He and pianist Erik Deutsch formed a new band, called the Triple Crown, and he became a father for the second time to Waylon Albert "Blackjack" Jennings, in April. In urgent fashion, Jennings and the Triple Crown began recording; they released the video/download-only single "Outlaw You," his screed against the country music establishment. It reached the top spot on CMT's daily audience request competition and stayed there until a dispute with his former label dictated it be removed. The first official single from the forthcoming album, "The Deed and the Dollar," again reached the top spot in the daily CMT request competition. Jennings' fifth album, Family Man, followed soon after in March of 2012 -- minus "Outlaw You." His next album, The Other Life, was released a year later on his own Black Country Rock label; it featured guest appearances from Patty Griffin, Scott H. Biram, and Jim Dandy of Black Oak Arkansas. The Other Live, Jennings' second live album, recorded during his 2013 tour and featuring many of the songs from The Other Life, appeared early in 2014, again from Black Country Rock.
Radio Birds
To see and hear them now, you might never believe that a few short years ago Radio Birds had a completely different lineup, look, and sound. In early 2013, rising united from their earlier musical experiences, these four young men decided to take a risk and start completely over with a new name and sound. They quickly worked up a batch of new songs, and by that summer they had recorded a successful EP and had begun playing extensively, even winning the 2013 Masquerade Musicians Showcase in Atlanta, GA. Within a year of their rechristening, they were booked for The Rock Boat 2014 (and 15!), were featured in a major motion picture (Jason Momoa's Road to Paloma), played SXSW, and attracted the services of indie Atlanta label Brash Music. Things have moved quickly for a reason, and everyone involved points back to two causes: Radio Bird's irresistible character and undeniably unique sound.

That sound is simple: Plain-Old Rock and Roll Music with a distinctly hairy touch. Meaning, it is not clean, it is not easy, (or too difficult), and it is not The Next Logical Revival of a Previously Popular Genre From the Seventies. It is what you get when four guys all write music with the basic beliefs that it must be played live, and it must be played everywhere. Each of their songs is different from the others and is balanced by the web of harmonies that entangles the whole group. Everybody sings, and sometimes, you just can't help but sing along.

Radio Birds has taken their sound out to the world, and their dedicated touring and writing schedule proves one thing: Radio Birds wants you to hear them now more than ever. They are proud to announce an exciting new album, recorded at the world-famous Southern Tracks studio, featuring an impressively diverse set of songs and even additional instrumentation by Will Turpin (Collective Soul) and Mark O'Connor. Equipped with new songs, longer hair, and scruffier beards, they look forward to spending the next several months bringing this music to everyone who will listen.
Casey James Prestwood
Casey James Prestwood
If the late night scene on Broadway Street in Nashville, Tennessee could talk, they'd sing you a Casey James Prestwood tune. Drenched in the honest twang that made Gram Parsons and Hank Williams household names, the classic crooner's carefree vocals and careful guitar playing feel more like country than a worn-in pair of cowboy boots.
Venue Information:
Summit Music Hall
1902 Blake St.
Denver, CO, 80208
http://thesummitmusichall.com/